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  • ‏إظهار الرسائل ذات التسميات trends google. إظهار كافة الرسائل
    ‏إظهار الرسائل ذات التسميات trends google. إظهار كافة الرسائل

    From visionary filmmakers James Cameron (AVATAR) and Robert Rodriguez (SIN CITY), comes ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL, an epic adventure of hope and empowerment. When Alita (Rosa Salazar) awakens with no memory of who she is in a future world she does not recognize, she is taken in by Ido (Christoph Waltz), a compassionate doctor who realizes that somewhere in this abandoned cyborg shell is the heart and soul of a young woman with an extraordinary past. As Alita learns to navigate her new life and the treacherous streets of Iron City, Ido tries to shield her from her mysterious history while her street-smart new friend Hugo (Keean Johnson) offers instead to help trigger her memories. But it is only when the deadly and corrupt forces that run the city come after Alita that she discovers a clue to her past – she has unique fighting abilities that those in power will stop at nothing to control. If she can stay out of their grasp, she could be the key to saving her friends, her family and the world she’s grown to love.



    DIRECTED BY
    Robert Rodriguez

    SCREENPLAY BY
    James Cameron & Laeta Kalogridis

    BASED ON THE GRAPHIC NOVEL (“MANGA”) SERIES:
    “Gunnm” By Yukito Kishiro

    PRODUCED BY
    James Cameron, Jon Landau

    CAST
    Rosa Salazar, Christoph Waltz, Jennifer Connelly, Mahershala Ali, Ed Skrein, Jackie Earle Haley, Keean Johnson


    The frigid temperatures this week are keeping Minnesotans indoors — and putting a halt to winter activities, but there's a bright spot.
    Experts say bitterly cold weather actually can have positive impacts on lakes from curbing the growth of harmful algae to reducing water loss.
    Minnesota weather

    One of the greatest benefits of an extended cold snap is that it helps form a thick ice cover on a lake. When the temperature is 20 degrees below zero — around where it's projected to hover across much of the state on Wednesday — a lake could form 3 or 4 inches of ice per day, said Lee Engel, supervisor of the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency's water quality monitoring unit.

    • Clear ice: Smooth lake ice thrills Twin Cities skaters
    • Climate Cast: Climate shifts affecting Great Lakes ice cover
    Thicker ice usually means a later ice-out in the spring, Engel said. That slows the growth of plants and algae because the snow-covered ice blocks out the sun from the depths of the lake where they form.

    Eleven-year-old Evan Trompeter wades through algae in Little Rock Lake. 
    "It wouldn't let them get a head start with warm water in the spring," Engel said. "We may see benefits of not having so many harmful algal blooms throughout the summer."

    Recent studies have linked climate change to the loss of ice cover on lakes across the Northern Hemisphere. A thick ice cover that takes longer to melt in the spring also could help keep the lake's temperature a little cooler.
      

    That's a good thing: On average, Minnesota's lake temperatures have been on the rise. And some native species of fish do better when a lake's water temperature is cooler. In Lake Superior, that includes lake trout, brook trout and lake herring or cisco, said Cory Goldsworthy, area fisheries supervisor with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

    "That colder weather spell really helps those water temperatures, which are beneficial to those native species," he said.

    On the flip side, some invasive species of fish, like alewife and sea lamprey, don't do as well in colder waters, Goldsworthy said.

    And sport anglers might find that some non-native fish stocked in Lake Superior — such as rainbow and brown trout, coho salmon and Chinook salmon — are tougher to catch in colder years, Goldsworthy said.

    A deep freeze can help curb the growth of other aquatic invaders, but it won't wipe them out.

    Thicker ice near the shore that extends all the way to the bottom of a lake can help slow the growth of invasive species that prefer shallower water, like zebra mussels, said Valerie Brady, an aquatic biologist with the Natural Resources Research Institute at the University of Minnesota Duluth.

    Clear, smooth ice has formed on Lake Minnetonka. 
    But some of those invasive species will likely survive in deeper waters over the winter months and recolonize in the spring. The water that's underneath ice stays at about 4 degrees Celsius — about 39 degrees Fahrenheit — Brady said, and most invasive plants and animals in Minnesota do just fine under those conditions.

    "Most of the plants that can make it up here can tolerate these freezing temperatures," Brady said. So, in order for those species to really be disrupted by the cold, she said, "it has to get awfully cold, and ice has to get down into the sediment and actually damage things."

    Another positive benefit of this intense cold: It might help to slow lakes' loss of water due to evaporation, a phenomenon happening on the Great Lakes thanks to warmer winters and the lack of ice cover.

    "When the Great Lakes ice over, they're capped off. They can't lose their water to evaporation," Brady said. "So it changes the water balance for the whole Great Lakes, depending on how cold the year is and how much of the Great Lakes is covered by ice."

    Of course, the benefits of this cold could evaporate if warmer temperatures come early this year and melt that ice cover off the lakes.

    "It really comes down to what happens this spring," Engel said. "Do we get a warm spell that's going to negate this cold temperature and ice that we're forming, or does it stay cool?"

    News source:mprnews
    “This horrible attack was on one of our own, in our town,” an insider on the hip-hop drama told Deadline today. “Everyone’s behind Jussie 100%, and he’s the first priority, but people need to process what happened to him too,” added the source on musical drama created by Lee Daniels and Danny Strong.



    In that process, counselors and a SAG-AFTRA representative were made available on the set of the Terrence Howard-Taraji P. Henson series Tuesday to talk with and listen to cast, crew and producers. The intention is that those trauma counselors will continue to maintain a presence on the Windy City-filmed Empire over the coming few weeks as Smollett returns to the show and the law enforcement investigation into the two men who attacked the actor unfolds.

    Key principals on the show were informed early Tuesday of the racist and homophobic slurs, beating and chemical substance-drenching Smollett endured despite attempting to defend himself. However, the overall Empire set was told collectively by a producer of what had happened to the actor who plays Jamal Lyon on the show.

    Having just returned from New York City late last night after a much-delayed flight, Smollett was supposed to be on set for filming on the Empire‘s fifth season this week. Recovering after a short stint in Northwestern Hospital, Smollett is said now to be in relatively good shape after the harsh assault. His planned February 2 concert at The Troubadour in West Hollywood was removed from the legendary club’s schedule at one point today but is now back on.

    Depending on his recovery and the frigid weather conditions in Chicago, the actor could be back filming the Brett Mahoney-showrun Empire by early next week, I’m told.

    It looks very unlikely that Smollett or anyone on Empire will be working much this week.

    Empire will be going dark Wednesday — along the upcoming Strong-EP’d Proven Innocent, which also films in Chicago — as the Midwest metropolis takes a full subzero blast from the polar vortex. Shutting almost the whole down, temperatures are below minus-22 tonight and expected to fall far further on what could be a record-breaking Wednesday.

    It is unclear if Empire and other Chicago filmed shows on multiple networks will be off as well at this point

    Stating that they consider what happened to Smollett out on the icy streets of Chicago today to be a “possible hate crime,” city detectives are working closely with the FBI in the hunt for those responsible for the attack.

    While very little official information has been made public, police and agents have been scouring the area where the assault took place for witnesses and video footage. Again, while nothing has been said publicly yet, we hear that the substance poured over Smollett appears to be determined to be bleach.

    Or as Lee Daniels said in his deeply sorrowful reaction to what happened to the actor whose character is based in no small part on the Empire co-creator’s life: “It’s just another f*cking day in America.”


    جميع الحقوق محفوظة ل رائج نت
    2017